Skip to content

Retrograde Pyelogram for Kidney Stones

Make an Appointment

Our team is here to help you make an appointment with the specialists that you need.

Retrograde Pyelogram for Kidney Stones

Overview

The retrograde pyelogram uses a dye to find out whether a kidney stone or something else is blocking your urinary tract. During the test, your doctor will insert a thin, lighted tube (cystoscope) into the urethra, which carries urine out of the body from the bladder. He or she will then put a catheter through the cystoscope and into a ureter, which carries urine from the kidney to the bladder. Dye is injected through the catheter, and X-rays are taken.

You will probably need a local or regional anesthetic with this procedure.

Your doctor may do this test if an intravenous pyelogram (IVP) does not help with the diagnosis. In an IVP, the dye is injected through a vein in your arm.

Why It Is Done

You may have a retrograde pyelogram if:

Pregnant women normally do not have this test, because the X-rays may harm the unborn baby.

Results

Normal

The kidneys, ureters, and bladder appear normal.

Abnormal

The flow of the dye (contrast material) is blocked, either by a stone or another urinary problem.

Credits

Current as of: February 28, 2023

Author: Healthwise Staff
Clinical Review Board: All Healthwise education is reviewed by a team that includes physicians, nurses, advanced practitioners, registered dieticians, and other healthcare professionals.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated, disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. Learn how we develop our content.